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Appetizer, Side, Vegetarian, Fall, Winter |120 calories per serving| 30 minute recipe

Brussels Sprout Apple Slaw with Cranberries and Walnuts

No other vegetable has caused such controversy at the dinner table. Some may love Brussels sprouts fresh sweetness, while others loathe their tangy bitterness. If you’re still wary of these mini cabbages, try this easy slaw with a sweet touch of apples, dried cranberries and walnuts to cut down on the bitter flavor. It packs a delicious punch and adding cruciferous vegetables, like Brussels sprouts, to your diet can help lower risk for certain cancers, especially those of the colon, mouth, esophagus and stomach.

Ingredients

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  • 3/4 lb. Brussels sprouts
  • 1 Fuji or Gala apple, peeled, cored and finely chopped
  • 2/3 cup dried cranberries
  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts
  • 1/2 tsp. kosher salt
  • 1/8 tsp. freshly ground pepper
  • 1/3 cup fresh Meyer lemon juice
  • 1 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
Makes 8 servings (1/2 cup). Per serving: 120 calories, 7 g total fat (.5 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat), 0 mg cholesterol, 15 g carbohydrates, 2 g protein, 3 g dietary fiber, 135 mg sodium, 9 g sugar, 0 g added sugar.

Directions

  1. Trim bottom from sprouts and remove any loose or bruised leaves. Place shredding disc or fine slicing disc in food processor, and using feeder tube, gradually shred Brussels sprouts; there will be about 4 1/2 cups. Transfer shredded sprouts to mixing bowl.
  2. Add apple, cranberries, walnuts, salt, pepper and lemon juice and stir with a fork to combine. Add oil and stir well. Cover and refrigerate slaw for 1-3 hours or overnight for flavors to marinate. Re-stir before serving.

Tips

  • If Meyer lemon juice is not available, use 1/4 cup regular fresh lemon juice or juice from 2 large lemons.
  • Slaw is best served within 24 hours.

This recipe contains cancer fighting foods:

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