When you include the American Institute for Cancer Research in your estate plans, you make a major difference in the fight against cancer.

Corporate Champions who partner with the American Institute for Cancer Research stand at the forefront of the fight against cancer

The Continuous Update Project (CUP) is an ongoing program that analyzes global research on how diet, nutrition and physical activity affect cancer risk and survival.

A major milestone in cancer research, the Third Expert Report analyzes and synthesizes the evidence gathered in CUP reports and serves as a vital resource for anyone interested in preventing cancer.

AICR has pushed research to new heights, and has helped thousands of communities better understand the intersection of lifestyle, nutrition, and cancer.

Read real-life accounts of how AICR is changing lives through cancer prevention and survivorship.

We bring a detailed policy framework to our advocacy efforts, and provide lawmakers with the scientific evidence they need to achieve our objectives.

AICR champions research that increases understanding of the relationship between nutrition, lifestyle, and cancer.

AICR’s resources can help you navigate questions about nutrition and lifestyle, and empower you to advocate for your health.

AICR is committed to putting what we know about cancer prevention into action. To help you live healthier, we’ve taken the latest research and made 10 Recommendations for Cancer Prevention.

Nutrition Facts

How to Read The Nutrition Label

An estimated 40% of all cancer cases can be prevented. Eating a healthy diet, being more active and maintaining a healthy weight are, after not smoking, the most important ways to reduce cancer risk. 

Explore the Nutrition Facts Label below by clicking on the plus signs.

Serving Size & Servings Per Container

This is the first thing to check. Servings size is the amount of food most people typically eat at one time. All of the nutrition information listed on the label applies to one serving. Compare the amount of the food you typically eat to the serving size listed. If the serving size is ½ cup, but you typically eat 1 cup, then you will be getting twice the number of calories, fat and other nutrients listed on the label. The servings per container is the total number of serving sizes in the whole package.

Calories

It is important to look at the calories. This section shows the number of calories in one serving. You can compare this to 2,000 calories, which is an average of what most American adults need. However, this differs for everyone and may be lower or higher. If you are trying to lose weight to lower your cancer risk you may want to consume fewer calories. There is strong evidence that having overweight or obesity is a cause of many cancers.

Percent Daily Values

Daily Values are an average level of nutrients for a person eating 2,000 calories per day. You may need more or less than 2,000 calories per day. Aim for 5% or less saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol and sodium. Aim for 20% or more vitamins, minerals and fiber.

You can download AICR's Fact sheet on the Nutrition Facts Label below.

Fat & Sodium

Make sure the item you are eating doesn’t have too much saturated fat, trans fat and sodium. Saturated fats and trans fat are linked to an increased risk for heart disease. Pay attention to sodium—the higher the sodium content compared to overall calories is indicative of a highly processed food. Aim to eat more whole, unprocessed foods.

Watch out for food with more than 20% DV of fat and sodium.

Dietary Fiber

This is key to look at for cancer prevention. Aim for foods high in fiber. AICR recommends a diet that provides at least 30g of fiber from food sources. There is strong evidence that consuming dietary fiber helps protect against colorectal cancer and weight gain, overweight and obesity.

Sugar & Added Sugar

There is an indirect link between sugar and cancer. AICR recommends limiting consumption of sugar sweetened drinks and other processed foods high in sugars for cancer prevention. The national guidelines recommend to consume less than 10% of our daily calories from added sugars.

The American Heart Association recommends no more than 6 teaspoons (or 25g) of added sugar per day for women and no more than 9 teaspoons (or 36g) of added sugar per day for men.

You can download AICR’s Fact sheet on the Nutrition Facts Label by CLICKING HERE.
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