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AICR Food Facts  >  Foods That Fight Cancer

Strawberries

This content was last updated on January 6, 2020

The Cancer Research

The ever-growing body of scientific research on strawberries is focused on the potential for its compounds to influence the genes that govern cancer development. Earlier studies focused on how the fruit supports our antioxidant defenses.

Interpreting the data

After a systematic review of the global scientific literature, AICR/WCRF analyzed how fruits and their nutrients affect the risk of developing cancer.

  • Evidence categorized as “convincing” or “probable” means there is strong research showing a causal relationship to cancer—either decreasing or increasing the risk. The research must include quality human studies that meet specific criteria and biological explanations for the findings.
  • A convincing or probable judgment is strong enough to justify recommendations.
  • There is probable evidence that foods with dietary fiber DECREASE the risk of:•
    • Colorectal cancer
  • There is probable evidence that fruit and non-starchy vegetables combined DECREASE the risk of:• cancers of the aerodigestive tract (mouth, pharynx, nasopharynx, larynx, esophagus, lung, stomach, and colorectal cancers)
  • Evidence categorized as “limited suggestive” means results are generally consistent in overall conclusions, but it’s rarely strong enough to justify recommendations to reduce the risk of cancer.
  • Limited evidence suggests that fruits may DECREASE the risk of:
    • Lung cancer (in people who smoke or used to smoke tobacco) and squamous cell esophageal cancer
  • Limited evidence suggests that foods containing vitamin C may DECREASE the risk of:
    • Lung cancer (in people who smoke) and colon cancer

 

Source: AICR/WCRF. Diet, Nutrition, Physical Activity and Cancer: A Global Perspective, 2018.

Ongoing Areas of Investigation

  • Laboratory Research
    • In cell and animal studies, anthocyanins influence cell signaling in ways that increase antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and carcinogen-deactivating enzymes. They inhibit cancer cells’ growth and ability to spread and activate signaling that leads to the self-destruction of abnormal cells.
    • In cell and animal studies, phenolic acids increase cells’ antioxidant and anti-inflammatory defenses against damage that could lead to cancer. Emerging evidence in animal studies suggests they may also improve glucose metabolism and decrease insulin resistance, and alter the gut microbiota (microbes living in the colon), creating an environment in the body less likely to support cancer.
    • Tannins such as ellagitannins and proanthocyanidins are complex compounds that are mostly unabsorbed. Microbes in the gut break them down to form other phytochemicals.
      • Ellagitannins are broken down in the digestive system to ellagic acid and then to urolithins that can be absorbed into the body. In cell and animal studies, these compounds increase antioxidant enzymes, decreasing free radical damage to DNA that can lead to cancer. By influencing gene expression, they decrease growth and stimulate the self-destruction of several types of cancer cells.
      • In some cell studies, urolithins inhibit the aromatase enzyme that produces estrogen and inhibits the growth of estrogen-responsive breast cancer cells.
      • Animal studies show decreased inflammation in the colon with ellagitannins and the compounds that form from them at levels that could be reached by people eating a healthful diet.
    • In limited animal studies, strawberries inhibit inflammation and decrease the growth of several types of cancer cells. Animal studies often use freeze-dried strawberry powder, which is extra-concentrated in ellagic acid.
    • Be cautious about interpreting laboratory studies as applicable to humans. Cell studies often use phytochemical compounds in the form they occur in berries. But in humans, these are broken down into other compounds that circulate through the body. Moreover, laboratory studies may use phytochemicals in concentrations far beyond levels that would circulate in the body.
  • Human Studies

    Human studies related to strawberries and cancer risk compare groups of people who consume relatively high and low amounts of total fruit, dietary fiber, berries, or strawberries specifically.

    People who eat more fruits have a lower risk of a wide range of cancers. This probably reflects combined protection from many different nutrients and compounds they contain.

    Greater consumption of strawberries was associated with a lower risk of estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) breast cancer (but not ER+) in an analysis of 20 observational population studies. In a limited number of short-term clinical trials, many showed decreases in markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, increases in antioxidant defense indicators, and reductions in blood sugar rise after eating.

    Dietary Fiber: Observational population studies link high dietary fiber consumption with reduced risk of colorectal cancer. One meta-analysis of 16 prospective studies also link dietary fiber with a lower risk of breast cancer. However, analysis for the AICR/WCRF Third Expert Report considered the potential for an association of dietary fiber and this and several other cancers and found the evidence too limited to support a conclusion.

    Vitamin C: Population studies comparing people with higher and lower levels of vitamin C in their diets, and especially levels circulating in their blood, link higher amounts with lower overall risk of cancer. This effect is larger when comparing people with very low levels to moderately increased levels than comparing people with moderate and much higher levels. Higher levels of vitamin C from foods are linked with a lower risk of lung cancer among people who smoke tobacco, although not in those who used to smoke or who have never smoked.

    Research also shows an association between diets with more vitamin C and lower risk of colon cancer. That’s even after adjusting for other risk factors for colon cancer, such as alcohol, red meat and tobacco. Evidence for both lung and colon cancer is rated as Limited Suggestive in the AICR/WCRF Third Expert Report, and more research is needed.

    Ellagitannins and urolithins: Bacteria in the colon convert ellagitannins from strawberries and other berries to ellagic acid and then to urolithins that can be absorbed. People differ dramatically in the amount and types of urolithins they produce from ellagic acid, which could cause differences in the benefits individuals get from these foods.

    Flavonoids found in strawberries: Higher levels of anthocyanins in the diet were strongly associated with lower levels of markers of inflammation, and flavonols and flavan-3-ols were linked with lower levels of oxidative stress in a cross-sectional analysis of a large population study.

References

  1. Miller K, Feucht W, Schmid M. Bioactive Compounds of Strawberry and Blueberry and Their Potential Health Effects Based on Human Intervention Studies: A Brief Overview. Nutrients. 2019;11(7):1510.
  2. Duthie SJ. Berry phytochemicals, genomic stability and cancer: Evidence for chemoprotection at several stages in the carcinogenic process. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2007;51(6):665-674.
  3. de Sousa Moraes LF, Sun X, Peluzio MdCG, Zhu M-J. Anthocyanins/anthocyanidins and colorectal cancer: What is behind the scenes? Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2019;59(1):59-71.
  4. Del Rio D, Rodriguez-Mateos A, Spencer JP, Tognolini M, Borges G, Crozier A. Dietary (poly)phenolics in human health: structures, bioavailability, and evidence of protective effects against chronic diseases. Antioxid Redox Signal. 2013;18(14):1818-1892.
  5. Tajik N, Tajik M, Mack I, Enck P. The potential effects of chlorogenic acid, the main phenolic components in coffee, on health: a comprehensive review of the literature. Eur J Nutr. 2017;56(7):2215-2244.
  6. Villa-Rodriguez JA, Ifie I, Gonzalez-Aguilar GA, Roopchand DE. The Gastrointestinal Tract as Prime Site for Cardiometabolic Protection by Dietary Polyphenols. Advances in Nutrition. 2019;10(6):999-1011.
  7. Ismail T, Calcabrini C, Diaz AR, et al. Ellagitannins in Cancer Chemoprevention and Therapy. Toxins. 2016;8(5):151.
  8. Montgomery M, Srinivasan A. Epigenetic Gene Regulation by Dietary Compounds in Cancer Prevention. Advances in Nutrition. 2019;10(6):1012-1028.
  9. Forbes-Hernandez TY, Gasparrini M, Afrin S, et al. The Healthy Effects of Strawberry Polyphenols: Which Strategy behind Antioxidant Capacity? Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2016;56(sup1):S46-S59.
  10. Kang I, Buckner T, Shay NF, Gu L, Chung S. Improvements in Metabolic Health with Consumption of Ellagic Acid and Subsequent Conversion into Urolithins: Evidence and Mechanisms. Advances in Nutrition. 2016;7(5):961-972.
  11. Afrin S, Giampieri F, Gasparrini M, et al. Chemopreventive and Therapeutic Effects of Edible Berries: A Focus on Colon Cancer Prevention and Treatment. Molecules. 2016;21(2):169.
  12. World Cancer Research Fund / American Institute for Cancer Research. Continuous Update Project Expert Report 2018. Wholegrains, vegetables and fruit and the risk of cancer. Available at: dietandcancerreport.org.
  13. Aune D. Plant Foods, Antioxidant Biomarkers, and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease, Cancer, and Mortality: A Review of the Evidence. Advances in Nutrition. 2019;10(Supplement_4):S404-S421.
  14. Jung S, Spiegelman D, Baglietto L, et al. Fruit and Vegetable Intake and Risk of Breast Cancer by Hormone Receptor Status. JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 2013;105(3):219-236.
  15. Afrin S, Gasparrini M, Forbes-Hernandez TY, et al. Promising Health Benefits of the Strawberry: A Focus on Clinical Studies. J Agric Food Chem. 2016;64(22):4435-4449.
  16. Ma Y, Hu M, Zhou L, et al. Dietary fiber intake and risks of proximal and distal colon cancers: A meta-analysis. Medicine. 2018;97(36):e11678.
  17. World Cancer Research Fund / American Institute for Cancer Research. Continuous Update Project Expert Report 2018. Diet, nutrition, physical activity and colorectal cancer. Available at: dietandcancerreport.org.
  18. Aune D, Chan DS, Greenwood DC, et al. Dietary fiber and breast cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies. Ann Oncol. 2012;23(6):1394-1402.
  19. Aune D, Keum N, Giovannucci E, et al. Dietary intake and blood concentrations of antioxidants and the risk of cardiovascular disease, total cancer, and all-cause mortality: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies. Am J Clin Nutr. 2018;108(5):1069-1091.
  20. Burton-Freeman BM, Sandhu AK, Edirisinghe I. Red Raspberries and Their Bioactive Polyphenols: Cardiometabolic and Neuronal Health Links. Advances in Nutrition. 2016;7(1):44-65.
  21. Cassidy A, Rogers G, Peterson JJ, Dwyer JT, Lin H, Jacques PF. Higher dietary anthocyanin and flavonol intakes are associated with anti-inflammatory effects in a population of US adults1. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;102(1):172-181.

 

 

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