When you include the American Institute for Cancer Research in your estate plans, you make a major difference in the fight against cancer.

Corporate Champions who partner with the American Institute for Cancer Research stand at the forefront of the fight against cancer

The Continuous Update Project (CUP) is an ongoing program that analyzes global research on how diet, nutrition and physical activity affect cancer risk and survival.

A major milestone in cancer research, the Third Expert Report analyzes and synthesizes the evidence gathered in CUP reports and serves as a vital resource for anyone interested in preventing cancer.

AICR has pushed research to new heights, and has helped thousands of communities better understand the intersection of lifestyle, nutrition, and cancer.

Read real-life accounts of how AICR is changing lives through cancer prevention and survivorship.

We bring a detailed policy framework to our advocacy efforts, and provide lawmakers with the scientific evidence they need to achieve our objectives.

AICR champions research that increases understanding of the relationship between nutrition, lifestyle, and cancer.

AICR’s resources can help you navigate questions about nutrition and lifestyle, and empower you to advocate for your health.

AICR is committed to putting what we know about cancer prevention into action. To help you live healthier, we’ve taken the latest research and made 10 Cancer Prevention Recommendations.

February 26, 2015 | 2 minute read

Upgrade Your Falafel with Vegetarian Main Dish

, Upgrade Your Falafel with Vegetarian Main DishOne of our latest recipes, Chickpea and Butternut Squash Fritters, is a  restaurant-quality vegetarian dish that uses a unique combination of healthy cancer-preventive ingredients.

A lot of people are familiar with chickpeas in the deep-fried chickpea balls called falafels. But they are usually high in fat and calories. Chickpeas themselves are naturally low in fat; nutty and buttery-tasting. Like all legumes, they provide protein, vitamins, fiber and minerals that make them a staple in dishes ranging from Indian channa masala to Middle Eastern hummus.

Butternut squash is also rich in fiber as well as the antioxidant phytochemical beta-carotene, another cancer-preventive compound. The other ingredients – green onions, garlic, sage, cumin and red pepper flakes – taste great with the nutty chickpeas and subtly sweet squash and offer their own phytochemicals. Add the egg and whole-wheat flour and you get perfect fritters.

Contrast the taste of these lightly sautéed and crunchy fritters with mixed greens, toasted hazelnuts and a lemon juice flavored yogurt dressing drizzled on top, all part of this Health-e-Recipe.

Note that some hazelnuts come with their skins still on. You should remove the skins prior to eating because they taste bitter. To remove the hazelnut skins easily, in a saucepan bring four cups of water to a boil. Add a quarter cup of baking soda and hazelnuts while the water is bubbling and fizzing. Cook the hazelnuts for about four minutes. Then drain them in a colander over the sink. Run cold water over the hazelnuts and rub them with your fingers. The skins will easily come off. Give the hazelnuts a final rinse before toasting.

Here’s the recipe.

You can find more delicious AICR Healthy Recipes to reduce cancer risk and subscribe to our weekly recipe on our main recipe page.

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