When you include the American Institute for Cancer Research in your estate plans, you make a major difference in the fight against cancer.

Corporate Champions who partner with the American Institute for Cancer Research stand at the forefront of the fight against cancer

The Continuous Update Project (CUP) is an ongoing program that analyzes global research on how diet, nutrition and physical activity affect cancer risk and survival.

A major milestone in cancer research, the Third Expert Report analyzes and synthesizes the evidence gathered in CUP reports and serves as a vital resource for anyone interested in preventing cancer.

Whether you are a healthcare provider, a researcher, or just someone who wants to learn more about cancer prevention, we’re here to help.

AICR has pushed research to new heights, and has helped thousands of communities better understand the intersection of lifestyle, nutrition, and cancer.

Read real-life accounts of how AICR is changing lives through cancer prevention and survivorship.

We bring a detailed policy framework to our advocacy efforts, and provide lawmakers with the scientific evidence they need to achieve our objectives.

AICR champions research that increases understanding of the relationship between nutrition, lifestyle, and cancer.

AICR’s resources can help you navigate questions about nutrition and lifestyle, and empower you to advocate for your health.

AICR is committed to putting what we know about cancer prevention into action. To help you live healthier, we’ve taken the latest research and made 10 Cancer Prevention Recommendations.

December 22, 2010 | 2 minute read

Start Cooking! 3 favorite cookbooks for easy, delicious recipes

Bulgar Pilaf with Peppers from the New American Plate Cookbook

AICR gives lots of tips and ideas for healthy eating and provides many recipes (Health-e-Recipe, From the AICR Test Kitchen, e.g.) that we hope you use and enjoy.

But if you are just getting started cooking, or want to start and would like some background reading and tips on basic cooking, finding the right cookbook is important.

I am not a beginner, but also not an expert chef, so there are still kitchen mysteries that I am trying to understand, and in some cases, conquer.  These three books are among those I use often for easy recipes and reviewing basic techniques.  Each offers something unique.

1.            The New American Plate Cookbook:  Recipes for a Healthy Weight and a Healthy Life from AICR.

What it offers the new cook:  Straightforward and mostly simple to prepare recipes.

These recipes are delicious, healthy and uncomplicated and can help you reshape your plate to follow AICR’s recommendation to fill your plate with at least 2/3 plant foods and 1/3 or less meat. The pictures are beautiful and inspiring.You can also learn more about a cancer-protective diet and the glossary helps with some of the scientific words related to health and cancer prevention.

2.            The Art of Simple Food: Notes, Lessons, and Recipes From a Delicious Revolution by Alice Waters

What it offers the new cook:  Basic techniques, explanations and clear, step by step recipe instructions.

Simple Food begins with basics: kitchen equipment, utensils, food pantry and cooking techniques.  The recipes that follow are straightforward and, as is Alice Waters’ passion, the ingredients are fresh and simple.  A good read about food and cooking.

3.  Fix-It and Forget-It Lightly:  Healthy, Low-Fat Recipes for Your Slow Cooker by Phyllis Pellman Good

What it offers the new cook:  Easy assembly of soups, stews and other dishes.

The slow cooker has made a comeback in recent years, and this book offers quick and easy meals.  These recipes don’t always use fresh ingredients – there are some with canned soups for example.  With 500 recipes, I have found plenty to work with. One of my favorites is the Vegetable Spaghetti Sauce.

If you’re a beginner, what do you want in a cookbook?  If you already cook, what are some of your favorites?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

More From the Blog

Close