When you include the American Institute for Cancer Research in your estate plans, you make a major difference in the fight against cancer.

Corporate Champions who partner with the American Institute for Cancer Research stand at the forefront of the fight against cancer

The Continuous Update Project (CUP) is an ongoing program that analyzes global research on how diet, nutrition and physical activity affect cancer risk and survival.

A major milestone in cancer research, the Third Expert Report analyzes and synthesizes the evidence gathered in CUP reports and serves as a vital resource for anyone interested in preventing cancer.

Whether you are a healthcare provider, a researcher, or just someone who wants to learn more about cancer prevention, we’re here to help.

AICR has pushed research to new heights, and has helped thousands of communities better understand the intersection of lifestyle, nutrition, and cancer.

Read real-life accounts of how AICR is changing lives through cancer prevention and survivorship.

We bring a detailed policy framework to our advocacy efforts, and provide lawmakers with the scientific evidence they need to achieve our objectives.

AICR champions research that increases understanding of the relationship between nutrition, lifestyle, and cancer.

AICR’s resources can help you navigate questions about nutrition and lifestyle, and empower you to advocate for your health.

AICR is committed to putting what we know about cancer prevention into action. To help you live healthier, we’ve taken the latest research and made 10 Cancer Prevention Recommendations.

May 22, 2012 | 2 minute read

PSA Screening: There's More to Prostate Cancer Prevention

Today the US Preventive Services Task Force — an advisory panel of cancer experts — released a new recommendation that men should no longer routinely undergo a PSA blood test to screen for prostate cancer.  The federally appointed panel concluded that the harms of unnecessary surgeries or other interventions outweigh the benefits of the test.

The Task Force released the recommendation in today’s issue of the journal Annals of Internal Medicine.

The American Urological Society is one organization saying the Task Force is taking an extreme position, and that regular PSA screening for men 50 and over saves lives.

While the back-and-forth continues, we at AICR believe that the decision of how often to screen for this and other cancers remains a personal one, and one that is best decided in consultation with one’s healthcare provider.

But every time a new controversy flares over screening guidelines, they threaten to steal focus from the crucial fact that there’s much more to cancer prevention than tests and checkups.

In the case of prostate cancer, for example, the AICR/WCRF expert report and its continuous updates found strong evidence that lifestyle plays a role in lowering risk — particularly a diet high in plant foods that contain lycopene, like tomatoes, watermelon, grapefruit and asparagus. Foods that contain selenium (such as oatmeal and Brazil nuts) have also been linked to lower risk for prostate cancer.

Testing plays a key role, and we all must make decisions about how to apply screening guidelines to our lives, informed by discussion with a trusted physician. But living a cancer-preventive lifestyle — eating a plant-based diet, being active at least 30 minutes a day and staying at a healthy weight — could prevent over 27,000 prostate cancers every year in the US, and hundreds of thousands of additional cancers as well.

That advice, at least, remains as uncontroversial as it was yesterday.

2 comments on “PSA Screening: There's More to Prostate Cancer Prevention

  1. Gabe Canales on

    Glen,
    Thanks for the post. As someone diagnosed at age 35 with prostate cancer – with no family history of the disease – I believe diet and lifestyle was an impetus to my diagnosis.
    We have to continue to focus on reaching a younger generation with the message of prevention. Here’s my recent piece, Prostate Cancer Prevention Begins When Men Are Boys. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/gabe-canales/prostate-cancer_b_1409927.html
    Thanks for all you do.
    Best,
    Gabe Canales

    Reply
  2. Gabe Canales on

    Glen,
    Thanks for the post. As someone diagnosed at age 35 with prostate cancer – with no family history of the disease – I believe diet and lifestyle was an impetus to my diagnosis.
    We have to continue to focus on reaching a younger generation with the message of prevention. Here’s my recent piece, Prostate Cancer Prevention Begins When Men Are Boys. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/gabe-canales/prostate-cancer_b_1409927.html
    Thanks for all you do.
    Best,
    Gabe Canales

    Reply

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