When you include the American Institute for Cancer Research in your estate plans, you make a major difference in the fight against cancer.

Corporate Champions who partner with the American Institute for Cancer Research stand at the forefront of the fight against cancer

The Continuous Update Project (CUP) is an ongoing program that analyzes global research on how diet, nutrition and physical activity affect cancer risk and survival.

A major milestone in cancer research, the Third Expert Report analyzes and synthesizes the evidence gathered in CUP reports and serves as a vital resource for anyone interested in preventing cancer.

AICR has pushed research to new heights, and has helped thousands of communities better understand the intersection of lifestyle, nutrition, and cancer.

Read real-life accounts of how AICR is changing lives through cancer prevention and survivorship.

We bring a detailed policy framework to our advocacy efforts, and provide lawmakers with the scientific evidence they need to achieve our objectives.

AICR champions research that increases understanding of the relationship between nutrition, lifestyle, and cancer.

AICR’s resources can help you navigate questions about nutrition and lifestyle, and empower you to advocate for your health.

AICR is committed to putting what we know about cancer prevention into action. To help you live healthier, we’ve taken the latest research and made 10 Cancer Prevention Recommendations.

February 18, 2011 | 2 minute read

Ordering Up Calories

Do you know how many calories are in a fish sandwich from McDonalds? 400! That same sandwich from Long John Silver’s is 540 calories (140 more). But how could you have known?

Restaurants don’t have to tell you how many calories are in the foods they serve, but soon they will. By March 2011, chain restaurants will be required by the FDA to post the calorie content of foods they serve.

As you peruse the menu trying to decide between the bacon cheeseburger and the grilled chicken sandwich, you’ll see the how many calories are in each item. And with this knowledge, you’ll have the power to make healthier choices when dining out.

Restaurants are also required to post a statement that additional nutritional information is available upon request, and to have it for customers in written form. It will be similar to a food label, but will eaters know what the numbers mean?

Knowing the calorie and nutrient content of a food won’t help much without an understanding of how much a person needs daily. Restaurants are also required to include a statement about suggested total daily caloric intake.

To brush up on your knowledge of the nutrition facts label, check out our Guide to the Nutrition Facts Label.

Will knowing the calorie content of menu items help you choose healthier foods when dining out?

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