When you include the American Institute for Cancer Research in your estate plans, you make a major difference in the fight against cancer.

Corporate Champions who partner with the American Institute for Cancer Research stand at the forefront of the fight against cancer

The Continuous Update Project (CUP) is an ongoing program that analyzes global research on how diet, nutrition and physical activity affect cancer risk and survival.

A major milestone in cancer research, the Third Expert Report analyzes and synthesizes the evidence gathered in CUP reports and serves as a vital resource for anyone interested in preventing cancer.

Whether you are a healthcare provider, a researcher, or just someone who wants to learn more about cancer prevention, we’re here to help.

AICR has pushed research to new heights, and has helped thousands of communities better understand the intersection of lifestyle, nutrition, and cancer.

Read real-life accounts of how AICR is changing lives through cancer prevention and survivorship.

We bring a detailed policy framework to our advocacy efforts, and provide lawmakers with the scientific evidence they need to achieve our objectives.

AICR champions research that increases understanding of the relationship between nutrition, lifestyle, and cancer.

AICR’s resources can help you navigate questions about nutrition and lifestyle, and empower you to advocate for your health.

AICR is committed to putting what we know about cancer prevention into action. To help you live healthier, we’ve taken the latest research and made 10 Cancer Prevention Recommendations.

April 25, 2014 | 2 minute read

Recipe: Layers of Cancer Protection

, Recipe: Layers of Cancer ProtectionOur Health-e-Recipe for Roasted Vegetable Lasagna is meatless and full of hearty, delicious cancer-fighting ingredients. It’s also runner-up to our March Madness winner, Brussels Sprout Slaw.

To prepare the eggplant and zucchini slices for roasting, you can either use canola oil cooking spray or brush them lightly with some olive oil, if you prefer. Then roast them for 20 minutes on each side. Roasting veggies makes them sweet and tender.

Then layer them onto the low-fat cheese mixture and top with tomato sauce. All processed tomato products (think juice, paste, sauce) contain plenty of lycopene. This compound is a carotenoid that may help guard against prostate and other cancers, according to research studies.

Because of their higher fiber content, whole-wheat pastas and other whole grains take longer to digest than refined grains. That’s one reason why eating them can help keep your blood sugar levels healthy.

Together with the vegetables in this dish, the higher fiber in the noodles provides a substantial 11 grams of fiber per serving. That’s almost one-third of the amount recommended daily by health experts. Eating plenty of high-fiber foods like vegetables, fruits, whole grains and beans while keeping meat consumption low can help prevent colorectal cancer.

Find more healthy, tasty recipes at the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.

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