When you include the American Institute for Cancer Research in your estate plans, you make a major difference in the fight against cancer.

Corporate Champions who partner with the American Institute for Cancer Research stand at the forefront of the fight against cancer

The Continuous Update Project (CUP) is an ongoing program that analyzes global research on how diet, nutrition and physical activity affect cancer risk and survival.

A major milestone in cancer research, the Third Expert Report analyzes and synthesizes the evidence gathered in CUP reports and serves as a vital resource for anyone interested in preventing cancer.

AICR has pushed research to new heights, and has helped thousands of communities better understand the intersection of lifestyle, nutrition, and cancer.

Read real-life accounts of how AICR is changing lives through cancer prevention and survivorship.

We bring a detailed policy framework to our advocacy efforts, and provide lawmakers with the scientific evidence they need to achieve our objectives.

AICR champions research that increases understanding of the relationship between nutrition, lifestyle, and cancer.

AICR’s resources can help you navigate questions about nutrition and lifestyle, and empower you to advocate for your health.

AICR is committed to putting what we know about cancer prevention into action. To help you live healthier, we’ve taken the latest research and made 10 Cancer Prevention Recommendations.

September 19, 2014 | 2 minute read

Increasing Waistlines and Cancer Risk

Americans’ waistlines are widening, finds a new study, even as our weight appears to be holding steady. The findings are important for cancer risk — along with other diseases — because while obesity is a clear cause of cancers, abdominal obesity may also independently increase risk., Increasing Waistlines and Cancer Risk

The study, published in JAMA, found that Americans’ average waist circumference increased progressively slightly more than an inch from 1999 to 2012. During those years, waists bumped up from 37.6 to 38.8 inches.

Prevalence also increased, with over half of Americans now having abdominal obesity. Prevalence rose from 46 percent in 1999 to 54 percent in 2012, among both men and women.

The study included 32,816 participants who were part of multiple national surveys from 1999-2000 to 2011-2012. Previous analyses of data from the same surveys show that obesity did not change much from 2003 to 2012, the authors write.

Why that would be is unknown, but what is known now is that not all body fat is the same. Location matters.

Some research suggests that visceral fat is an independent risk factor for certain cancers. It also may indicate higher risk of metabolic abnormalities that can play a role in type 2 diabetes and other chronic diseases. Even people at a healthy BMI may be at increased risk if they have too much visceral fat, some research suggests.

For women, a waist measurement of 31.5 inches or more indicates higher cancer risk. For men, a waist measurement of 37 inches or more indicates high risk.

Waist circumference, like BMI, are just indicators of having a healthy amount of body fat. But routinely tracking your weight and waist circumference checking give you information about your risk.

You can learn more on healthy waist circumference and calculate your BMI here.

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