When you include the American Institute for Cancer Research in your estate plans, you make a major difference in the fight against cancer.

Corporate Champions who partner with the American Institute for Cancer Research stand at the forefront of the fight against cancer

The Continuous Update Project (CUP) is an ongoing program that analyzes global research on how diet, nutrition and physical activity affect cancer risk and survival.

A major milestone in cancer research, the Third Expert Report analyzes and synthesizes the evidence gathered in CUP reports and serves as a vital resource for anyone interested in preventing cancer.

AICR has pushed research to new heights, and has helped thousands of communities better understand the intersection of lifestyle, nutrition, and cancer.

Read real-life accounts of how AICR is changing lives through cancer prevention and survivorship.

We bring a detailed policy framework to our advocacy efforts, and provide lawmakers with the scientific evidence they need to achieve our objectives.

AICR champions research that increases understanding of the relationship between nutrition, lifestyle, and cancer.

AICR’s resources can help you navigate questions about nutrition and lifestyle, and empower you to advocate for your health.

AICR is committed to putting what we know about cancer prevention into action. To help you live healthier, we’ve taken the latest research and made 10 Cancer Prevention Recommendations.

October 12, 2015 | 2 minute read

What do you suggest for healthy choices when tailgating?

Q: What do you suggest for healthy choices when tailgating?

A: There are many delicious options for tailgate parties that promote good health by providing plenty of plant foods like vegetables, fruits, whole grains and beans and limiting high calorie foods. If you grill, choose chicken; include some vegetable kebabs, too, for a delicious way to add vegetables. If you like make-ahead dishes, chili, sloppy joes, lasagna, and enchilada casserole can all be lean and healthy when prepared with lots of vegetables and beans. Try them with lean ground turkey if you don’t want to make them vegetarian; if the dish includes cheese, limit the amount and use reduced-fat options.

For options that let you do the prep work in advance, stir-fry some vegetables and chicken, and let people create their own fajitas by rolling them up in whole-wheat tortillas, with or without some reduced-fat cheese. If your tailgates tend toward sandwiches and subs, make them lean with fresh meat like turkey or a little lean roast beef and load them with vegetables. Cut the sandwiches into small sections to make portion control easier for people, and make some with whole-grain bread and rolls.

Since it’s easy to nosh through more chips than intended, provide a range of vegetables instead; add some whole-wheat pita bread wedges and hummus if you want. Grapes and melon chunks on skewers or toothpicks make a healthy way to finish off the tailgate with a sweet note. Since drinks can add so many unwanted calories, make sure to offer one or more calorie-free selections, like water (plain, sparkling water, or infused with a little fruit or cucumber and basil) and tea (iced, plain or hot chai-flavored tea).

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