When you include the American Institute for Cancer Research in your estate plans, you make a major difference in the fight against cancer.

Corporate Champions who partner with the American Institute for Cancer Research stand at the forefront of the fight against cancer

The Continuous Update Project (CUP) is an ongoing program that analyzes global research on how diet, nutrition and physical activity affect cancer risk and survival.

A major milestone in cancer research, the Third Expert Report analyzes and synthesizes the evidence gathered in CUP reports and serves as a vital resource for anyone interested in preventing cancer.

Whether you are a healthcare provider, a researcher, or just someone who wants to learn more about cancer prevention, we’re here to help.

AICR has pushed research to new heights, and has helped thousands of communities better understand the intersection of lifestyle, nutrition, and cancer.

Read real-life accounts of how AICR is changing lives through cancer prevention and survivorship.

We bring a detailed policy framework to our advocacy efforts, and provide lawmakers with the scientific evidence they need to achieve our objectives.

AICR champions research that increases understanding of the relationship between nutrition, lifestyle, and cancer.

AICR’s resources can help you navigate questions about nutrition and lifestyle, and empower you to advocate for your health.

AICR is committed to putting what we know about cancer prevention into action. To help you live healthier, we’ve taken the latest research and made 10 Cancer Prevention Recommendations.

April 1, 2010 | 2 minute read

April Fools Food Hoaxes

Be on guard today, April 1, for all kinds of mischief from friends, family and even the most respected news media – they might all be looking for that “gotcha” moment.  Here is a sampling of food related April Fools news stories over the past 150 years.

1878: Edison invents a food machine.  It would end world hunger because it could change soil directly into cereal and water into wine, one newspaper reported.  Edison had just invented the phonograph, so many Americans believed his genius was unlimited, so apparently there were plenty of believers.

1957: A British news show reported on the year’s bumper spaghetti crop in Switzerland. They showed Swiss peasants harvesting strands of spaghetti from trees. Many people called the BBC asking how they could grow a spaghetti tree.

1996: The Taco Bell Corporation announced it had bought the Liberty Bell and was renaming it the Taco Liberty Bell. Angry citizens called to express their anger. Eventually, Taco Bell let it be known that it was a practical joke.

2002 A supermarket chain in Britain advertised that they had developed a genetically modified ‘whistling carrot.’ These carrots reportedly grew with tapered airholes in their side and when fully cooked, these airholes caused the vegetable to whistle.

2010 A U.S. coffee chain announced two new beverage sizes coming to stores in the U.S. and Canada this fall.  “Plenta” is a 128-ounce drink for those with a large appetite for caffeine and the 2-ounce Micra is for those you need just “a tiny sip.”

These are hoaxes clearly not meant to be taken seriously on April Fools’ day, unfortunately there are a lot of diet and health hoaxes designed to take your money with false promises and misleading advertising.  Products and plans “guaranteed” to cure cancer or for quick weight loss prey on people looking for hope and guidance.

For authoritative, evidence-based diet information you are at the right place – AICR is the leading authority on food, nutrition, physical activity and the prevention of cancer.  Spend some time looking at our  recommendations and guidelines for preventing cancer on our website.

Share this reliable and sensible information with your friends and family too!

Information taken from: http://www.museumofhoaxes.com/hoax/aprilfool/

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