When you include the American Institute for Cancer Research in your estate plans, you make a major difference in the fight against cancer.

Corporate Champions who partner with the American Institute for Cancer Research stand at the forefront of the fight against cancer

The Continuous Update Project (CUP) is an ongoing program that analyzes global research on how diet, nutrition and physical activity affect cancer risk and survival.

A major milestone in cancer research, the Third Expert Report analyzes and synthesizes the evidence gathered in CUP reports and serves as a vital resource for anyone interested in preventing cancer.

AICR has pushed research to new heights, and has helped thousands of communities better understand the intersection of lifestyle, nutrition, and cancer.

Read real-life accounts of how AICR is changing lives through cancer prevention and survivorship.

We bring a detailed policy framework to our advocacy efforts, and provide lawmakers with the scientific evidence they need to achieve our objectives.

AICR champions research that increases understanding of the relationship between nutrition, lifestyle, and cancer.

AICR’s resources can help you navigate questions about nutrition and lifestyle, and empower you to advocate for your health.

AICR is committed to putting what we know about cancer prevention into action. To help you live healthier, we’ve taken the latest research and made 10 Cancer Prevention Recommendations.

November 5, 2015 | 2 minute read

Are Some Pies Healthier Than Others?

How a pie is made has a bigger influence on its calorie content than what kind it is. The one exception is that an equal sized portion of pecan pie almost always provides 100 or 200 calories beyond fruit and pumpkin pie.

However, if pecan pie is your favorite and its super-sweet taste leaves you satisfied after a smaller slice, enjoy a thin slice of what you like best.

•    Apple pie may contain from 300 to just over 400 calories per slice, depending on how much fat and sugar are added.

•    A slice of pumpkin pie traditionally contains about 320 calories, but recipe adaptations like using evaporated skim milk can reduce fat from the usual 14 or 15 grams per slice, consequently reducing calories, too.

•    If the pie filling is what you love, leave the crust behind and save 125 to 150 calories per slice.

•    If you’re the one cooking the pie, you can even bake the filling without a crust, more like a custard or fruit cobbler. If the crust is part of what you love about pie, you can reduce the crust’s calories somewhat and make it healthier by limiting added fat, using a mixture of canola oil and butter, and making half the flour whole wheat.

The biggest calorie savings comes from sticking to only one piece of pie, eating it slowly and savoring every bite.

 Karen Collins, MS, RDN, is AICR’s Nutrition Advisor.

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