When you include the American Institute for Cancer Research in your estate plans, you make a major difference in the fight against cancer.

Corporate Champions who partner with the American Institute for Cancer Research stand at the forefront of the fight against cancer

The Continuous Update Project (CUP) is an ongoing program that analyzes global research on how diet, nutrition and physical activity affect cancer risk and survival.

A major milestone in cancer research, the Third Expert Report analyzes and synthesizes the evidence gathered in CUP reports and serves as a vital resource for anyone interested in preventing cancer.

Whether you are a healthcare provider, a researcher, or just someone who wants to learn more about cancer prevention, we’re here to help.

AICR has pushed research to new heights, and has helped thousands of communities better understand the intersection of lifestyle, nutrition, and cancer.

Read real-life accounts of how AICR is changing lives through cancer prevention and survivorship.

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AICR champions research that increases understanding of the relationship between nutrition, lifestyle, and cancer.

AICR’s resources can help you navigate questions about nutrition and lifestyle, and empower you to advocate for your health.

AICR is committed to putting what we know about cancer prevention into action. To help you live healthier, we’ve taken the latest research and made 10 Cancer Prevention Recommendations.

October 20, 2011 | 3 minute read

Vitamin E to Fight Cancer: Food, not Supplements

In this week’s Cancer Research Update, you can read about the latest results from the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT), a study looking at whether supplements of these nutrients might help reduce risk of prostate cancer.

What is vitamin E and what does it do in the body that made researchers think it might help lower risk for cancer?

Vitamin E is an antioxidant – that means it can protect our cells from being damaged by “free radicals.” Free radicals are unstable, high-energy molecules; some of these are a by-product of our own metabolism. We are also exposed to free radicals from cigarette smoke, air pollution and UV light from the sun.

Antioxidants such as vitamins E and C can help keep these molecules from damaging our cells. That’s why researchers are looking at whether supplements of these vitamins and other plant compounds (phytochemicals) could help lower risk for cancer and other chronic diseases associated with free radicals.

Fortunately you can get vitamin E in your diet through nuts, seeds and vegetable oils – and there’s some in green leafy vegetables. As discussed in the CRU article, it is possible that the antioxidant work that vitamin E and other phytochemicals do is dependent on other substances in the whole food. If you just take the supplement, it may not be able to work in the same way as it does coming from food.

You can get a whole array of antioxidants and other health promoting substances in vegetables, fruit, whole grains, nuts and legumes. Although we don’t yet know exactly how they all work together in the body, we do know that eating a variety of plant foods with minimal processing in amounts right for you can provide nutrients you need and help you get to and stay a healthy weight. A great start to overall good health and reducing your risk for cancer and other chronic diseases.

The RDA for adults for vitamin E is 15 mg. Here’s a listing of some foods that contain vitamin E:

Table 2: Selected Food Sources of Vitamin E (Alpha-Tocopherol) [7

Food

Milligrams (mg)

per serving

Percent DV*

Wheat germ oil, 1 tablespoon

20.3

100

Sunflower seeds, dry roasted, 1 ounce

7.4

37

Almonds, dry roasted, 1 ounce

6.8

34

Sunflower oil, 1 tablespoon

5.6

28

Safflower oil, 1 tablespoon

4.6

25

Hazelnuts, dry roasted, 1 ounce

4.3

22

Peanut butter, 2 tablespoons

2.9

15

Peanuts, dry roasted, 1 ounce

2.2

11

Corn oil, 1 tablespoon

1.9

10

Spinach, boiled, ½ cup

1.9

10

Broccoli, chopped, boiled, ½ cup

1.2

6

Soybean oil, 1 tablespoon

1.1

6

Kiwifruit, 1 medium

1.1

6

Mango, sliced, ½ cup

0.7

4

Tomato, raw, 1 medium

0.7

4

Spinach, raw, 1 cup

0.6

4

From: http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VITAMINE

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