When you include the American Institute for Cancer Research in your estate plans, you make a major difference in the fight against cancer.

Corporate Champions who partner with the American Institute for Cancer Research stand at the forefront of the fight against cancer

The Continuous Update Project (CUP) is an ongoing program that analyzes global research on how diet, nutrition and physical activity affect cancer risk and survival.

A major milestone in cancer research, the Third Expert Report analyzes and synthesizes the evidence gathered in CUP reports and serves as a vital resource for anyone interested in preventing cancer.

Whether you are a healthcare provider, a researcher, or just someone who wants to learn more about cancer prevention, we’re here to help.

AICR has pushed research to new heights, and has helped thousands of communities better understand the intersection of lifestyle, nutrition, and cancer.

Read real-life accounts of how AICR is changing lives through cancer prevention and survivorship.

We bring a detailed policy framework to our advocacy efforts, and provide lawmakers with the scientific evidence they need to achieve our objectives.

AICR champions research that increases understanding of the relationship between nutrition, lifestyle, and cancer.

AICR’s resources can help you navigate questions about nutrition and lifestyle, and empower you to advocate for your health.

AICR is committed to putting what we know about cancer prevention into action. To help you live healthier, we’ve taken the latest research and made 10 Cancer Prevention Recommendations.

January 20, 2010 | 2 minute read

The Aroma of Fullness

Can’t stop eating? Food scientists are on the case.

According to a paper published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists may soon be developing a new generation of foods that release hunger-sating aromas. The goal is that these foods will prevent people from overeating by releasing fullness-inducing scents during chewing.

, The Aroma of Fullness

The future of foods may include releasing anti-hunger aromas during chewing.

Previously, scientists have worked to develop tasty foods that trigger a feeling of fullness, but their effect only went into action after they were swallowed. The paper’s authors found that aromas released during chewing contribute to the feeling of fullness and possibly to the decision to stop eating. Molecules that make up a food’s aroma apparently do so by activating areas of the brain that signal fullness.

This field of research is still preliminary, note the authors, and right now there’s no real food products.

But luckily, there are plenty of eating habits you can try now to help you feel full without feeling hungry. One way is to follow the New American Plate way of eating, filling up your plate with at least two-thirds fruits, vegetables, and grains. The fiber and water in plant foods gives a feeling of fullness without supplying a lot of calories.

Do you have any strategies to stop eating and/or feel full? Share.

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