When you include the American Institute for Cancer Research in your estate plans, you make a major difference in the fight against cancer.

Corporate Champions who partner with the American Institute for Cancer Research stand at the forefront of the fight against cancer

The Continuous Update Project (CUP) is an ongoing program that analyzes global research on how diet, nutrition and physical activity affect cancer risk and survival.

A major milestone in cancer research, the Third Expert Report analyzes and synthesizes the evidence gathered in CUP reports and serves as a vital resource for anyone interested in preventing cancer.

Whether you are a healthcare provider, a researcher, or just someone who wants to learn more about cancer prevention, we’re here to help.

AICR has pushed research to new heights, and has helped thousands of communities better understand the intersection of lifestyle, nutrition, and cancer.

Read real-life accounts of how AICR is changing lives through cancer prevention and survivorship.

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AICR champions research that increases understanding of the relationship between nutrition, lifestyle, and cancer.

AICR’s resources can help you navigate questions about nutrition and lifestyle, and empower you to advocate for your health.

AICR is committed to putting what we know about cancer prevention into action. To help you live healthier, we’ve taken the latest research and made 10 Cancer Prevention Recommendations.

October 8, 2014 | 2 minute read

Pass the Pumpkin: Three Other Fall Healthy Favorites

Though pumpkin has begun to take over the fall scene, there are many other fruits and vegetables to enjoy this time of year – all toting cancer protective nutrients. From apples to zucchini, here are three new ways to enjoy some familiar Autumn fruits and veggies., Pass the Pumpkin: Three Other Fall Healthy Favorites

Zucchini Fries: Instead of the usual roasted vegetable, give zucchini fries a try. They’re a great alternative to traditional fries and offer less calories and lots of flavor.

Making zucchini fries can be a bit of a tedious process, but the end result is well worth it.

To make “fries,” leave on the skin and cut the zucchini in half width-wise. Then cut it into quarter-inch “planks” length-wise. Dredge the fries in egg white, flour, and a mix of breadcrumbs and Parmesan cheese. You can substitute breadcrumbs for Panko crumbs for extra crispiness. Bake your fries at 400 degrees until they are golden brown and crispy on the outside. Serve warm with your favorite dipping sauce or plain. Your family will definitely ask for these again.

Mashing rutabaga and turnips: Both rutabagas and turnips offer a natural sweetness and are lighter than mashed potatoes, making a perfect mashed potato substitute for something different.

Peel and cut into 2-inch chunks. Just be careful when cutting these items. They tend to have tough skin so make sure you are cutting on a stable surface. Boil or roast the chunks until tender and then smash with a potato masher. Season to taste and drizzle with a little olive oil. Once you get to the table and have that first forkful, you will be happy you put in the work. Here’s a recipe that pairs sweet potatoes with turnips.

Stuffing apples: With apple season in full swing, you’re sure to find plenty of varieties. In lieu of apple pie, try baked apples stuffed with hazelnuts and figs. This dessert still offers the warmth and comfort of apple pie, but leaves out extra calories by skipping the crust.

Cut off the tops of the apples and scoop out the seeds and some of the flesh using a spoon. Fill the inside of the apple with a mix of chopped hazelnuts and figs and bake until tender.

How do you like to make fall favorites?

Tauryn Carter has a Bachelors of Science degree in Culinary Nutrition from Johnson & Wales University. She is currently an AICR intern.

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