When you include the American Institute for Cancer Research in your estate plans, you make a major difference in the fight against cancer.

Corporate Champions who partner with the American Institute for Cancer Research stand at the forefront of the fight against cancer

The Continuous Update Project (CUP) is an ongoing program that analyzes global research on how diet, nutrition and physical activity affect cancer risk and survival.

A major milestone in cancer research, the Third Expert Report analyzes and synthesizes the evidence gathered in CUP reports and serves as a vital resource for anyone interested in preventing cancer.

Whether you are a healthcare provider, a researcher, or just someone who wants to learn more about cancer prevention, we’re here to help.

AICR has pushed research to new heights, and has helped thousands of communities better understand the intersection of lifestyle, nutrition, and cancer.

Read real-life accounts of how AICR is changing lives through cancer prevention and survivorship.

We bring a detailed policy framework to our advocacy efforts, and provide lawmakers with the scientific evidence they need to achieve our objectives.

AICR champions research that increases understanding of the relationship between nutrition, lifestyle, and cancer.

AICR’s resources can help you navigate questions about nutrition and lifestyle, and empower you to advocate for your health.

AICR is committed to putting what we know about cancer prevention into action. To help you live healthier, we’ve taken the latest research and made 10 Cancer Prevention Recommendations.

April 15, 2019 | 2 minute read

Moving and Eating Better: Going Beyond the Blueprint at #AICR19

“Build it and they will come.” This is what God said to Noah when he was skeptical about embarking on the ark. But, is it always true? How many patient programs are conceived, conducted and then abandoned because they do not draw a critical mass of patients? Hundreds of diet and exercise interventions have proven effective in clinical trials, but how many now sit on the shelf because they are too difficult or too expensive to implement? The answer is hundreds.


At the American Institute for Cancer Research 2019 Research Conference, there are many people determined to change that, though. I am particularly excited about one of the split sessions I am co-chairing with Dr. Kerri Winters-Stone, which will address key issues in dissemination and implementation (D&I) research as it relates to diet, weight management and physical activity interventions to prevent or control cancer.

The session, titled, “Dissemination and Implementation Science – Getting Americans Moving and Eating Better,” will be convened on Thursday, May 16th at 11:15 am to 12:30 pm. April Oh, Program Director in the Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch of the National Cancer Institute, will discuss key elements of D&I research. These elements and methods are critical to gain a foothold so that future interventions can make a larger and more sustainable impact on the overall health of our target populations. Laura Rogers, Professor of Preventive Medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, will follow this foundational presentation with an example of how she and her team adapted the Better Exercise Adherence after Treatment for (BEAT) cancer intervention that was initially pursued within an academic cancer center, so that it could be implemented more broadly in the community care setting. She will further discuss adaptations that utilize a web-based platform and the steps that she is currently pursuing to enhance scalability and even broader dissemination. Come join this session to learn how to make more of an impact with your programs and your trials.

Join leading scientists, researchers, health professionals and dietitians to hear the latest in diet and lifestyle research in cancer prevention and survivorship. The AICR 2019 Research Conference “Diet, Obesity, Physical Activity and Cancer – Beyond the Blueprint,” will provide a unique forum for conversations on lifestyle-related research across the cancer continuum.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

More From the Blog

Close