When you include the American Institute for Cancer Research in your estate plans, you make a major difference in the fight against cancer.

Corporate Champions who partner with the American Institute for Cancer Research stand at the forefront of the fight against cancer

The Continuous Update Project (CUP) is an ongoing program that analyzes global research on how diet, nutrition and physical activity affect cancer risk and survival.

A major milestone in cancer research, the Third Expert Report analyzes and synthesizes the evidence gathered in CUP reports and serves as a vital resource for anyone interested in preventing cancer.

Whether you are a healthcare provider, a researcher, or just someone who wants to learn more about cancer prevention, we’re here to help.

AICR has pushed research to new heights, and has helped thousands of communities better understand the intersection of lifestyle, nutrition, and cancer.

Read real-life accounts of how AICR is changing lives through cancer prevention and survivorship.

We bring a detailed policy framework to our advocacy efforts, and provide lawmakers with the scientific evidence they need to achieve our objectives.

AICR champions research that increases understanding of the relationship between nutrition, lifestyle, and cancer.

AICR’s resources can help you navigate questions about nutrition and lifestyle, and empower you to advocate for your health.

AICR is committed to putting what we know about cancer prevention into action. To help you live healthier, we’ve taken the latest research and made 10 Cancer Prevention Recommendations.

June 27, 2016 | 2 minute read

HealthTalk: Is lemonade a lower-calorie alternative to regular soda?

Q: Is lemonade a lower-calorie alternative to regular soda?

A: Despite its healthier image, regular lemonade is not necessarily any lower in calories than an equal portion of a regular carbonated soft drink. Whether ready-to-drink or made at home from frozen concentrate or a powdered mix, most lemonade contains about 100 to 120 calories in each eight-ounce portion. This is not surprising since that eight-ounce drink contains the same amount of added sugar as a regular soda. Some powdered mixes have less added sugar, making them about thirty percent lower in calories. Other mixes and “light” bottled ready-to-drink lemonades are sweetened with zero-calorie sweeteners and contain ten or fewer calories, comparable to diet soft drinks.

You may also see ”lite” bottled lemonade-ice tea blends. In these, calorie content is reduced compared to regular soft drinks, but some bottles are large enough that the calorie information listed pertains to just a third or half of the bottle. For any of these sugar-containing beverages, finishing a large bottle or drinking glass after glass on a hot day can make calorie and sugar consumption add up quickly.

Unlike soda, some lemonade options may contain from 10 to 100 percent of the Daily Value for vitamin C. This is often because of added vitamin C and is not necessarily a sign of actual fruit juice content.

If you’re looking for a naturally low-calorie alternative to regular soda, try adding a few splashes of lemon or other juice to plain club soda or seltzer. Or consider ice tea (unsweetened or very lightly sweetened) instead.

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