When you include the American Institute for Cancer Research in your estate plans, you make a major difference in the fight against cancer.

Corporate Champions who partner with the American Institute for Cancer Research stand at the forefront of the fight against cancer

The Continuous Update Project (CUP) is an ongoing program that analyzes global research on how diet, nutrition and physical activity affect cancer risk and survival.

A major milestone in cancer research, the Third Expert Report analyzes and synthesizes the evidence gathered in CUP reports and serves as a vital resource for anyone interested in preventing cancer.

Whether you are a healthcare provider, a researcher, or just someone who wants to learn more about cancer prevention, we’re here to help.

AICR has pushed research to new heights, and has helped thousands of communities better understand the intersection of lifestyle, nutrition, and cancer.

Read real-life accounts of how AICR is changing lives through cancer prevention and survivorship.

We bring a detailed policy framework to our advocacy efforts, and provide lawmakers with the scientific evidence they need to achieve our objectives.

AICR champions research that increases understanding of the relationship between nutrition, lifestyle, and cancer.

AICR’s resources can help you navigate questions about nutrition and lifestyle, and empower you to advocate for your health.

AICR is committed to putting what we know about cancer prevention into action. To help you live healthier, we’ve taken the latest research and made 10 Cancer Prevention Recommendations.

January 21, 2013 | 2 minute read

HealthTalk: What is the difference between pure olive oil, light olive oil, virgin olive oil and extra virgin olive oil?

Q:        What is the difference between pure olive oil, light olive oil, virgin olive oil and extra virgin olive oil?

A:        In the United States we categorize olive oils into extra virgin (sometimes referred to as EVOO), virgin, light and classic (pure) olive oil. All these oils are made by extracting the juice of olives. All olive oils, like any other fat, contain about 120 calories per tablespoon. Extra virgin olive oil is the first product of the extraction process, and thus has the strongest flavor and aroma of the three types. Virgin olive oil is also from the first pressing but is of slightly lower quality. Light olive oil refers to the absence of flavor, which makes it appropriate for dishes that would otherwise clash with the stronger flavored oils. Classic or pure olive oil typically results from a mixture of virgin olive oil and refined oil. Nutritionally, the fat in all three types of olive oil is mainly monounsaturated fat (MUFA). When MUFA is substituted for saturated fat, it lowers LDL (“bad”) cholesterol without reducing HDL (“good”) cholesterol. Studies linking greater use of olive oil with lower risk of heart disease generally don’t look at specific types of olive oil. However, both heart health and other possible health benefits may also relate to anti-inflammatory, antioxidant benefits of several natural compounds in olive oil. Extra virgin oil offers the most potential health benefits because it is the least processed and retains more of these compounds, including squalene, polyphenols and tocopherols (related to vitamin E).

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