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November 6, 2013 | 2 minute read

Talking About… Processed Meat and Cancer

, Talking About… Processed Meat and CancerDiets high in red and processed meats are a cause of colorectal cancer. Period.

That finding from our 2007 expert report was only strengthened in the 2010 Continuous Update Project Report on Colorectal Cancer, which reviewed evidence published since the 2007 report.

At this writing, more studies continue to be added to the CUP database; in 2017, the CUP expert panel will review the collected evidence once again and issue updated Recommendations for Cancer Prevention.

The existence of a link between red and processed meat and colorectal cancer is no longer surprising. But now researchers are asking the next questions –1. What is it, exactly, in red and processed meat that’s responsible for the increased risk, and 2. Is there anything we can do about it?

Amanda J. Cross, PhD, of Imperial College London, UK, will be presenting evidence tomorrow at our 2013 AICR Research Conference on Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity and Cancer.

AICR’s advice: Skip processed meats altogether, or save them for special occasions. And when it comes to red meat (beef, lamb, pork), limit yourself to 18 ounces (cooked) per week.

We’ll be sharing on Twitter (#AICR13) and this blog the latest research on processed meat and cancer. You can read more here about processed meat.

One comment on “Talking About… Processed Meat and Cancer

  1. Nalliah Thayabharan on

    For hundreds of thousand years we survived on fruits, nuts, seeds, tubers and vegetable until we discovered fire and start roasting animals and birds. True carnivores born with built in tools like speed, strength, claws, teeth and talons for capture, kill and devour but we do NOT have hands that are designed for tearing into bellies of animals, but our hands are perfectly designed for picking fruits from trees. The strongest tough powerful animals like elephants, horses, camels eat only plant foods. Gorillas are 3 times the size of a man but 30 times stronger and they eat only leaves and fruits to produce all the protein they need.

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