When you include the American Institute for Cancer Research in your estate plans, you make a major difference in the fight against cancer.

Corporate Champions who partner with the American Institute for Cancer Research stand at the forefront of the fight against cancer

The Continuous Update Project (CUP) is an ongoing program that analyzes global research on how diet, nutrition and physical activity affect cancer risk and survival.

A major milestone in cancer research, the Third Expert Report analyzes and synthesizes the evidence gathered in CUP reports and serves as a vital resource for anyone interested in preventing cancer.

AICR has pushed research to new heights, and has helped thousands of communities better understand the intersection of lifestyle, nutrition, and cancer.

Read real-life accounts of how AICR is changing lives through cancer prevention and survivorship.

We bring a detailed policy framework to our advocacy efforts, and provide lawmakers with the scientific evidence they need to achieve our objectives.

AICR champions research that increases understanding of the relationship between nutrition, lifestyle, and cancer.

AICR’s resources can help you navigate questions about nutrition and lifestyle, and empower you to advocate for your health.

AICR is committed to putting what we know about cancer prevention into action. To help you live healthier, we’ve taken the latest research and made 10 Cancer Prevention Recommendations.

September 22, 2014 | 2 minute read

How accurate is the information treadmills and step machines provide about calories burned?

Q:       How accurate is the information treadmills and step machines provide about calories burned?

A:       The listing of calories used during exercise on equipment like treadmills, steppers and ellipticals is calculated based on formulas unique to each equipment manufacturer. The formulas use time and speed, combined with any relevant resistance settings and the personal information you input. Accuracy of the calculations varies, depending on how well the formula was tested on a large number of different people, how well-calibrated the equipment is kept, and the amount and accuracy of the information you provide. The most accurate use of information on calories from these machines is for comparing information from your workouts on the same equipment over time.

According to the American Council on Exercise (ACE), treadmills have been around longer and are more tested than other equipment, and so treadmills may have more reliable formulas than other equipment, such as ellipticals. Accuracy also depends on correct use of the equipment: if you lean on side rails or bars, you allow them to support some of your weight; this burns fewer calories and adds another reason that the calories you see listed may over-estimate what you have actually burned. In addition, different people doing identical exercise burn different amounts of calories.

Heavier people tend to burn more calories than lighter people doing the same activity. People who are less fit or less accustomed to a particular type of equipment burn more calories than people who are more fit and trained on the equipment. Even stride length, amount of lean muscle tissue, individual metabolism and medications can affect calorie-burning. To increase the calories you burn, work toward gradually increasing your speed, resistance/incline or amount of time you spend exercising.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

More From the Blog

Close