When you include the American Institute for Cancer Research in your estate plans, you make a major difference in the fight against cancer.

Corporate Champions who partner with the American Institute for Cancer Research stand at the forefront of the fight against cancer

The Continuous Update Project (CUP) is an ongoing program that analyzes global research on how diet, nutrition and physical activity affect cancer risk and survival.

A major milestone in cancer research, the Third Expert Report analyzes and synthesizes the evidence gathered in CUP reports and serves as a vital resource for anyone interested in preventing cancer.

Whether you are a healthcare provider, a researcher, or just someone who wants to learn more about cancer prevention, we’re here to help.

AICR has pushed research to new heights, and has helped thousands of communities better understand the intersection of lifestyle, nutrition, and cancer.

Read real-life accounts of how AICR is changing lives through cancer prevention and survivorship.

We bring a detailed policy framework to our advocacy efforts, and provide lawmakers with the scientific evidence they need to achieve our objectives.

AICR champions research that increases understanding of the relationship between nutrition, lifestyle, and cancer.

AICR’s resources can help you navigate questions about nutrition and lifestyle, and empower you to advocate for your health.

AICR is committed to putting what we know about cancer prevention into action. To help you live healthier, we’ve taken the latest research and made 10 Cancer Prevention Recommendations.

July 20, 2015 | 2 minute read

HealthTalk: How do people fit in the 30 minutes of activity every day recommended for lower cancer risk? I don’t have an extra 30 minutes in my day!

Q: How do people fit in the 30 minutes of activity every day recommended for lower cancer risk? I don’t have an extra 30 minutes in my day!

, HealthTalk: How do people fit in the 30 minutes of activity every day recommended for lower cancer risk? I don’t have an extra 30 minutes in my day!

A: Great news: You don’t have to get all 30 minutes of activity at one time to achieve health benefits! Many people find that shorter blocks of activity scattered throughout normal daily activities is a workable way to build a more active lifestyle. Blocks of at least ten minutes of “moderate” activity that raises your heart rate or breathing slightly is what research has linked to better health. Strategies include getting off public transportation one stop early, taking a short walk around the block right before breakfast or for a mid-afternoon break at work, and walking around a parking area or playing field while waiting for children or grandchildren you’re picking up. If you keep walking shoes handy, you’ll be ready to take advantage of those 10- or 15- minute openings between one thing and the next on your busy day’s “to do list.”  You can also look for things that you can do just as well – and probably more enjoyably – while walking as while sitting. For example, if you try to “check in” via phone or in person with family members or colleagues, perhaps there’s a place you could do that while walking.

These shorter blocks of activity may not provide as much relaxation or cardiovascular fitness benefit as 30 minutes at a time, so I encourage you to work at creating occasional opportunities for some longer activity, too. Nevertheless, don’t underestimate the power of a few blocks of 10 minutes at a moderate pace to improve hormone levels and chronic disease risk factors and give you energizing, stress-reducing breaks amidst busy days. If you’ve been sedentary, start with blocks of five or ten minutes of moderate activity and build up. Even 60 minutes a week is better than none. No matter your age, avoid physical inactivity.

Thirty minutes of physical activity a day can be difficult for some, but with these 3-Minute Office Workouts, you could be done before you even get home!

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