When you include the American Institute for Cancer Research in your estate plans, you make a major difference in the fight against cancer.

Corporate Champions who partner with the American Institute for Cancer Research stand at the forefront of the fight against cancer

The Continuous Update Project (CUP) is an ongoing program that analyzes global research on how diet, nutrition and physical activity affect cancer risk and survival.

A major milestone in cancer research, the Third Expert Report analyzes and synthesizes the evidence gathered in CUP reports and serves as a vital resource for anyone interested in preventing cancer.

AICR has pushed research to new heights, and has helped thousands of communities better understand the intersection of lifestyle, nutrition, and cancer.

Read real-life accounts of how AICR is changing lives through cancer prevention and survivorship.

We bring a detailed policy framework to our advocacy efforts, and provide lawmakers with the scientific evidence they need to achieve our objectives.

AICR champions research that increases understanding of the relationship between nutrition, lifestyle, and cancer.

AICR’s resources can help you navigate questions about nutrition and lifestyle, and empower you to advocate for your health.

AICR is committed to putting what we know about cancer prevention into action. To help you live healthier, we’ve taken the latest research and made 10 Cancer Prevention Recommendations.

May 23, 2013 | 1 minute read

Beyond Shish Kabob, Grilling Fun

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Except for skewering a couple of onions and tomatoes with cubes of meat for kabobs, the delicious possibilities of grilling a wide variety of vegetables often go unexplored. But our Health-e-Recipe for Grilled Vegetables helps you turn out plenty of terrific tasting vegetables for your summer barbecues.

 

Start by buying the freshest possible white and red onions, peppers, summer squash like zucchini or yellow crookneck, portobello mushrooms and asparagus you can find. (You can try eggplant and cherry tomatoes, too.) Have a mix of herbs, juice or balsamic vinegar and canola or olive oil on hand plus a basting brush ready. Get your grill heated to medium. Skewer bite-size pieces or just place halved veggies on the grate and baste, grilling for about 2 minutes on each side.

 

Vegetables don’t contain the saturated fats that meats do. When saturated fat drips onto a heat source during grilling, it can cause flareups of smoke and flames that contain carcinogens. So grilling vegetables using a vegetable-based oil like olive or canola is totally safe. (Ditto for firm-fleshed fruits.)

 

For taste-tested cancer-fighting recipes, visit the AICR Test Kitchen. Subscribe to our weekly Health-e-Recipes.

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