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WCRF/AICR
Global Network

AICR HealthTalk

Karen Collins, MS, RDN, CDN, FAND
American Institute for Cancer Research

Q:       How big a glass of juice is considered a serving of fruits or vegetables?

OJ

A:       As long as it is 100 percent juice, one-half cup (four ounces) of fruit or vegetable juice is considered equal to one-half cup of fruit or vegetables. Juice can supply many of the vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals found in whole fruits and vegetables. However, juice does not supply the fiber found in solid fruit, and the calories in fruit juice can add up quickly without producing lasting hunger satisfaction. For people who are unable to eat solid fruit due to some illness, several servings of juice daily can provide important nutrients. However, for the rest of us, most recommendations suggest that we drink no more than 3/4 to 1 cup of fruit juice a day. The American Academy of Pediatrics encourages children to choose whole fruit, too, and recommends limiting fruit juice to four to six ounces a day for children one to six years old. Choose carefully: a “juice cocktail” or “juice beverage” means it is not 100% juice. Right above the Nutrition Facts panel, you can find the exact percentage of juice in a juice-containing beverage. When checking nutrient content on the label, adjust for the package serving size listed, because it usually refers to an eight-ounce, not six-ounce, serving.

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The American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) is the cancer charity that fosters research on the relationship of nutrition, physical activity and weight management to cancer risk, interprets the scientific literature and educates the public about the results. It has contributed over $100 million for innovative research conducted at universities, hospitals and research centers across the country. AICR has published two landmark reports that interpret the accumulated research in the field, and is committed to a process of continuous review. AICR also provides a wide range of educational programs to help millions of Americans learn to make dietary changes for lower cancer risk. Its award-winning New American Plate program is presented in brochures, seminars and on its website, http://www.aicr.org. AICR is a member of the World Cancer Research Fund International.


For days when you want to skip the juice, take a look at our Water Makeover slideshow for ideas to spice up your water bottle.

Published on 12/22/2014

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