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Pomegranate Salsa

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December 30, 2014 | Issue 537

Unique, Seasonal Salsa

Pomegranate Salsa

Place a bowl of this attractive dish on any festive table and serve up some delicious cancer-fighting phytochemicals. This quick and easy recipe has many satisfying combinations – savory, sweet, crunchy, juicy, bright and colorful. Once prepared it can be served as an appetizer with baked whole-grain pita chips or used to top salad, salmon, chicken or plain yogurt.

Makes about 1⅓ cups.

Per 2 tablespoon serving: 19 calories, <1 g total fat (0 g saturated fat), 4 g carbohydrate,
<1 g protein, 1 g dietary fiber, 60 mg sodium.

  • 1 cup pomegranate arils
  • 1/2 nectarine, peach or Fuji apple, finely chopped
  • 1 Tbsp. finely chopped red onion
  • 2 tsp. finely chopped jalapeno pepper, optional
 
  • 2 tsp. pomegranate molasses or 2 Tbsp. pomegranate juice 1/4 tsp. salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup chopped cilantro

Directions

  1. In bowl, use fork to combine pomegranate arils, nectarine, onion, jalapeno (if using), pomegranate molasses, salt and 3-4 grinds pepper. Mix in cilantro. Let salsa sit for 10 minutes so flavors can meld.
  2. Serve as accompaniment with chicken, turkey, pork chops or grilled shrimp. Sprinkle over green salad, combine with cooked quinoa or add a spoonful to garnish a bowl of butternut squash soup. Salsa keeps for 2 days, tightly covered in refrigerator.

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Grocery list

Pomegranate arils
Nectarine, peach or Fuji apple
Red onion
Jalapeno pepper
Pomegranate molasses or juice
Salt
Black Pepper
Cilantro

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Did You Know?

Pomegranate arils (seeds) can easily be extracted in a bowl of water. The arils will sink to the bottom and the pulp will float.

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